33, The Key to the Door

A while ago, I wrote a post pointing out the 3 and 33 coincidences, if we can call them that, around this Crown virus crisis. It’s also good to know that (a) you’re not alone in spotting these coded messages and (b) however hard you try, as an uninitiate into the secret lore, there are so many more being pushed that you can’t find them all.

A reminder

Just recently, it was highlighted to me that the code was put out there right at the beginning. A call to arms, perhaps, for each and every man to begin enacting his small part of the giant jigsaw puzzle. Ordo Ab ChaoOrder out of Chaos or Order from Disorder, the motto of freemasonry. There’s certainly a been a lot of chaos this past year, just need to see what order is planned. It becomes more obvious when you see the robocops/police wandering around cafes and restaurants in France, tooled up in body armour and guns, demanding to see the telephone Coronapas of patrons. Somehow this is necessary and worse, considered normal. Anyway, cast your mind back to February and March 2020. Did you get the message when they talked about 33 cases in news stories across the world?

Sim City

About 30 years ago, an enjoyable computer game appeared on the market that allowed you to run a city exactly the way you wanted it, allocating zones as residential or industrial, then building infrastructure such as power stations, roads and railways. As I recall, the success in the game was measured by the growth of your cityscape and the amount of taxes collected. It was called SimCity.

Now, amusing as it was, fast forward 30 years and it becomes clear that either someone played that game and decided that the real world could be structured the same way, or, the whole point of the game was to condition a certain type of thinking in people that things being decided by higher powers was good and that taxes were good. I can’t agree with either of those last two prepositions and as a result, I gave up on the game pretty quickly. I even felt some strange guilt as I flattened a developed residential zone and thought about those imaginary SIMulated citizens, the lives they’d built and the dreams they had, which I’d just crushed with my belief that I somehow knew better.

Looking back, it’s clear that the game could be viewed as some kind of psychology test for world improvers. I’d bet, for example, that most politicans were fans. Take Justin “trendy” Trudeau, for example. Yes, please, take him. Every time I see him now, I see a child who probably played SimCity incessantly, never stopping and maybe even having discussions with his Dad (Fidel, or Pierre, take your pick) to analyse where he’d gone wrong so he could be a better world improver when he grew up. For sure, to be a politician now means that you really do not see the people you are supposed to represent as valid human beings, just commodities that can be swept off the table or electronically deleted to suit your higher purposes. Take Richard Holden, ConSelfServative MP for Northwest Durham and his recent Facebook tirade that people refusing the COVID-19 vaccine are idiots. Part of me senses he knows he may not be needing their votes ever again in a future general election, so his true colours about not even seeing them as valid people is revealed. Either because they won’t be able to vote, or an election will not be happening.

So, how might a real-life Sim City work? Well, you’d certainly need a lot of technology to make it happen, wouldn’t you? A reliable, high-speed internet network that could monitor the success or failure of each zone and the infrastructure you were building. Like 5G, perhaps? Only a conspiracy theorist would think that though, because of course the 5G infrastructure investment has continued unabated during a time people were supposed to be in lockdown and it’s all so we can have faster internet to call the overworked NHS or watch Netflix*, isn’t it? Secondly, what measurements of real-life success would you use…happiness..probably no…financial, probably yes. So if we measure every life in those terms, it fits entirely with the elimination of low-economic activity generating pensioners and not really caring about how people are doing as long as the tax revenues are up. Depression could go through the roof and be seen as positive for economic activity, as long as those SIMs are buying their meds and still paying their taxes.

This leads to the third question – how do you get those SIMs to undertake what you want to do without protest, or at least too much protest and still continue to have them as productive citizens – productive on your terms where you get to take a cut of their productivity through taxes, anyway? As I get older, I become more and more aware the SIM city-style planning that was carried out on my own doorstep in the 1940s to the present day. Let’s begin by looking at World War 2, for example, and ask if someone looked at a map and thought it rather inefficient that much of Europe overlapped with unworkable borders, where whole regions were comprised of villages and towns where one might be 90%, say, German, then the next, say, 90% Polish. These people co-existed side-by-side and traded and often intermarried, but the barriers of language, culture and patriotism might lead a high level world improver to wonder how you could, well, improve things. Of course, you couldn’t take the map, draw your preferred line, then get these people to move, so it’d take something serious like a war with mass death and displacement to make it happen. Which is what did happen, along with the destruction of huge residential areas, now converted back to wilderness or industrial zones.

You may or not agree with me, but in the 1950s, Durham County council drew a categorised list of every town and village in the County as being A, B, C or D, with D meaning the village was not have any money spent on it and that the residents would be encouraged, by neglect and closure of key facilities, to move. Sim City planning at it’s finest, since the residents themselves were never told this was going on until people found out many, many years later. My grandparents own village was categorised as D. It still exists now, as it got swallowed up by urbanisation and has become quite a desirable place to live. If anything, this shows the failure of centralised planning compared to a free market.

Then we have city centre planning in Newcastle in the 60s and 70s. I sat in the car with my Dad in the 1970s and drove past rows and rows of empty Victorian terraced houses in Scotswood, Newcastle, scheduled for demolition following compulsory purchase and removal of the residents. Many of whom had lived there for generations. Again, human emotion, attachment and community means nothing to the average, yet very dangerous, central planner. Just cold hard credits. The real legacy of these central planners was not just the destruction of the communities, but the building of horrific tower blocks of low, low quality, followed by the exposed corruption of central planners like T. Dan Smith and the demolition of many of these blocks in subsequent years. Incidentally, the young me watched a cartoon called Mary, Mungo and Midge about living in one of these tower blocks that were being built at breakneck speed across the country, that I’d now see as brainwashing for children of what a better centrally-planned future is going to be.

So, what about the future, how might you control your SIMs? I think we all got a little insight into it about 6 weeks ago, without even realising it. Picture the scene I am about to describe as akin to as something from a James Bond film. The evil arch-villain sits on a swivel armchair in front of a large screen with a major public event taking place. He demonstrates his power at the press of a button and the result is available for all the others attending the video conference to see. The arch-villain (let’s call him Swabia, for no reason in particular), then swivels on his chair to face the other video conference attendees, stroking the cat on his knee and says confidently, in guttural English – “…well, gentlemen, you have now seen the power of our new technology, are you not impressed?”. The other attendees are impressed and shocked at the power of what they just saw and then the bidding, or negotiations for the coming power divide begin.

What event am I talking about? Well, the collapse of Christian Eriksen in the Euro 21 opening game in Copenhagen. It was unlike anything I have ever seen in my 40 years of watching football matches and especially not for a world superstar, primed to sporting readiness for this tournament. What’s interesting is that tweets did come out saying Eriksen had had his COVID-19 “vaccine” in May. Danish media were all quick to dismiss this, without actually saying at any point that he had not had the injection. This probably says a lot about the quality of media and journalism, no desire to track down the truth, or if the truth has been tracked down, pass it onto their readers. Subsequently, doctors have no idea what happened to Eriksen that night, he’s now fine, but they’ve fitted a pacemaker anyway (perhaps he should’ve said no to that) and it’s debatable whether he’ll ever play top level football again. Now, imagine if you had the power to exterminate SIMs who were past their use-by date, say, the old ones, or make people ill in residential areas that you wished to convert to industrial or run a new piece of infrastructure like a road or railway line through – on this basis it’s a very useful technology to have. SimCity is no longer a game, but becomes real-life.

Come to think of it, the city of the future may also be a Simp City, given the decline in testosterone and increase in oestrogen levels in men recorded these past years. Something to talk about another day.

As an aside, I cancelled Netflix about 6 years ago and I’m never going back. Not only is it a lot of mind-programming, I cannot tolerate TV series of more than, say, 6 episodes and no defined end. I haven’t even watched BBC since Christmas 2020.

Water

One subject I omitted coverage of in the book to a great extent is the title of this post, Water. The essential of human life, for we could go a while without food and just maybe, nibble on some leaves, but we could not go without water for very long. Even humans in the state of hubris mentioned in the previous post know water is essential. The French, with their rich language and cultural Celtic history that’s still under there somewhere, awaiting a revival, even refer to it as L’Eau, quite literally, the life.

Yet, it is clearly taken for granted right now.

We shouldn’t be surprised. It’s there, quite literally, on tap for most of us whenever we need it and need it we do, for our daily showers, pots of tea/coffee and even chucking 1,000 litres of the stuff into a pool in the garden for the summer. What traditionally happens in markets is that as abundant commodities get cheaper, their abundance becomes relied upon and factored into modern life with increasing usage and reliance. It’s much the same with oil, where it’s used for heating, transport, packaging and even pharmaceuticals, among many things. Even corn, is apparently so abundant that the excess can be used to make Ethanol for adding to petrol, in an effort to appear “green”. I have no idea what’s green really about producing a foodstuff with artificial fertilisers, often produced from Natural Gas, then expending energy to convert that foodstuff into a fuel that can be added into petrol, but no matter, apparently this is somehow good for the planet. To the extent that the UK is about to introduce a new fuel with a higher percentage of Ethanol that may even damage car engines. It’s for the good of the environment though, right?

On this environmental note, did you know that manufacturing one car consumes a water footprint of approximately 500,000 litres of clean water? Think about that the next time that you’re told your water consumption is responsible for the destruction of the planet. Next, refer to the relatively recent James Bond film, A Quantum of Solace, in which water was the commodity targeted by the bad guys in order to take control of the world. Quantum, interesting word choice for another post on another day…Now you’ve done that, and realised that perhaps yet again the goldfish bowl entertainment presented to you years before is predictive programming, it may be time to think about potential water shortages. After all, little could re-engineer society quicker than a world where water was a resource to be fought over.

Which leads me onto recent press.

In a variety of locations, reservoirs are being drained. Official reasons given include cleaning, or simply to top up river levels. That’s certainly the reason given for the emptying of Tunstall reservoir, near the place of my birth in Northern England :-

No description available.

To the locals, that one doesn’t make any sense. The river in question, The Wear, has not been short of water lately and in fact overflowed a short while ago. It got me thinking, where else in the world this may be happening and a few internet searches helped confirm this is not an isolated phenomenon.

California, for example. Farmers here are mystified, since some of them will be unable to grow their planned crops this year at all because of this.

Colorado is also indulging in the same activities.

In Northern Italy, the story is presented as the exciting uncovering of a lost village.

In London, canals are drained as a clean-up operation. Might be a valid reason, or may not.

So, enjoy your water while you can. Nothing could displace the existing way of life quicker than to leave people without drinking water. Food -well yes, but you can survive a few days. Water – it all falls apart quickly. If it was possible to wager on how this goes, I’d put my money on that it’ll be water shortages caused by a dry summer, which was of course caused by….(dramatic pause)…Global Warming! Then it’s only one small step further to an extreme solution of locking people down into their homes and enforcing rationed usage of key resources. Perhaps even the curtailment of meat (those pesky cows and their methane are destroying our planet, of course), alongside water, electricity and even the stopping of retailing certain items in shops and online. Forcing people to stay in their homes would once have been seen as untenable, but after the flock has accepted it for the past year, they are very likely to do as they are told again. It’s for the good of the planet, right? I’d even take this a step further and say that the surveillance society now has the technology to actually monitor that you are sticking to the enforced climate lockdown, something that they have been lacking since The Crown implementation of 2020. Magnetised beings and a 5g network feels like something with great tracking potential, if you’re into that. Perhaps the Eriksen experiment was a public test run.

If this sounds like the life you want, then great. I don’t, but we’re both on this planet, trapped in what feels like a dystopian video game. Good luck with your quest, only the bad news is that this is not actually a video game, where, if it goes badly you can just press reset and start again. No, this is it and the choices we make now may be the difference between life and death.

The New World Financial Centre

The British Empire and Sir Stanford Raffles in particular were a very shrewd lot. They identified a seemingly irrelevant island with a population of about 150 people as a piece of prime real estate back in 1817. What’s happened since is well-known of course, as the city of Singapore has developed into a major international trade and financial hub, with all the wealth and status that goes alongside that.

This place had always been on my to do list, so when a work trip in 2018 presented me with the opportunity for a one day stopover, I took it with both hands. While I didn’t actually sit down for a Singapore Sling, I did take a wander around the Raffles hotel complex and see the art deco railway station, where bullet damage from the 1941 Japanese invasion was still visible in some of the outer walls, before it probably disappears as the city modernises even further and obliterates the British symbols. The railway itself has already been moved to the North of the island and the future of the station seemed uncertain then, but ghosts were visible everywhere, as I peered through the locked gate into the past, surrounded by modern skyscrapers. I also saw the 1920s post office building, now a hotel, the main square in front of the Town hall where hundreds of thousands were executed by the Japanese and one of the world’s most expensive pieces of undeveloped real estate, The Singapore Cricket Club. I can only wonder how much longer that last piece of Imperial history will last. The battle of Singapore itself in 1941 has always fascinated me. For obvious reasons, it does not feature large in British history when World War 2 is mentioned, but will probably forever be Britain’s biggest military defeat, with a loss of 100,000 military personnel into Japanese captivity and subsequent death, along with the loss of two Battleships – The Prince of Wales and The Repulse.

I’d love to revisit some day on less of an intense schedule, but I sense my days of travel are numbered and I’ve used most of those numbers up. No matter, at least I can say I saw some of the world before all prison doors were locked with a resounding thud.

At the time, I was not ignorant of the island’s position as a major trade route and centre of wealth. Goldmoney and Bullionvault have offered Singapore as a precious metals storage location for years. However, it’s only when you are actually there on the ground, staring up at the impressive skyscrapers that you really understand how the wealth and energy is migrating from the old world to the new.

It’s interesting how stories coincide once more and get you thinking on a particular route. A few weeks ago, I expressed the view that Bitcoin is a distraction, or a preparation for a release of a new monetary system to replace the Petrodollar that has existed since 1971, the year of my birth, the introduction of decimalisation to the UK, the closing of the Gold Convertibility window in the USA and the official founding of the World Economic Forum – more on the last one later. In my view, the coming of digital currencies is inevitable and they may not be nice, with features such as time limitation (spend it or lose it) and extra credits available only to those who follow the rules of society (get the jab or don’t eat meat?). However, for them to be truly accepted, they will need to engineer a collapse of the current system and when that system collapses, every monetary system change ever has had to promise some kind of gold backing to get the public onside.

Historically, the old world still rules the precious metals world, with familiar locations like New York, London and Switzerland being where most of that trade is transacted. As the old world declines further and the new world rises, an Asian powerhouse, one with independence, strong defences, good shipping links and a robust financial system to trade gold and silver is required. There’s no doubt on these metrics that Singapore ticks all the boxes.

What really triggered it was a story mentioning the huge new precious metals facilities being developed in Singapore. It’s not the first time media, including the BBC, have reported on this. Yes, it looks possible a new world currency backed by gold/silver is coming and it will all be stored in Singapore, perhaps with an offshoot for Europe in London. On this, Brexit suddenly makes more sense – a European nation outside EU control, a defendable island where the wealth can be stored as the mainland descends into destruction. The Corporation of London certainly has a pedigree line of survival and growth, regardless of the general situation in the country. You may laugh, but despite a recent short period of comparative peace, Europe has a long, long history of huge wars for resources and after a year of rewarding people for doing nothing, while the continent becomes ever-more dependent on a few producers to carry the mass on their shoulders cracks may appear and Atlas may yet shrug.

When you think about it, it’s interesting how Switzerland always managed to remain neutral during the many European wars of the last few centuries. It becomes clearer why when you are aware of the high levels of banking secrecy Switzerland has historically maintained regarding account holders and fund sources. Consider also how much plundered loot found its way to Switzerland during World War 2. Why, the World Economic Forum itself is even based in Switzerland and Klaus Schwab, it’s apparent founder, was born in Germany in 1938, just before World War 2 began. I’d be interested to learn more on his family history, and this article is something of a primer. Having conducted their meetings in Davos, Switzerland for the entire history of the organisation, they are now holding their first-ever meeting in Singapore in August, 2021.

On closer examination of the Asian map, Singapore is crucial to all trade heading from China, Japan and Korea etc to India then onwards to Europe. Ships can only sail through one narrow strait. The Evergreen in the Suez canal feels like the first visible supply disruption which will expose Europe to how reliant it has become on foreign imports of essentials. Perhaps when those containers do finally arrive, they will be loaded up with precious metals for the return trip as Europe is stripped bare?

Meanwhile, almost everyone in Europe wanders around like idiots, wearing masks and continuing to following “official advice”, not laws on all kinds of things that really are basic human rights, like seeing family and friends, or conducting mutally beneficial transactions with other human beings. Blithely unaware of the probable imminent end of their way of life. You know, that “way of life” that you have been told terrorists hated so much that it needed to be protected, yet was immediately signed away the moment you got told a new virus with a 99.6% survival rate hit?

What do I know really? If I was better at these things I wouldn’t be working in an office following the limitations of my school programming, but on the basis of these jigsaw pieces slotting together, perhaps we should be investing in Singapore. Especially banks if it is going to be the new Switzerland after the World Economic Forum meeting. Not to say there won’t be bumps along the way – one other thing about that map is the seeming inevitability of a conflict between the old world powers and the new. That same Asian map shows how China is totally hemmed in from the sea because the USA controls Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines. If China could punch through and take Taiwan or part of the Phillipines, they could control the Pacific. A war is brewing. I note, for example, that the UK recently sent their aircraft carrier to the China sea. A war in which Singapore will remain an agreed neutral by all parties, just like Switzerland did during the last century, but a war in which the destruction and rewards to the victors may well be huge and end up on this small island nation.

UK Government Borrowing in the Time of Corona

The BBC lays the amount of new money created in the UK, during the Corona crisis. To spell it out :-

“Since the beginning of the financial year in April, government borrowing has reached £214.9bn, £169.1bn more than a year ago.

The independent Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) has estimated it could reach £372.2bn by the end of the financial year in March.”

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-55013192

The natural consequences of this? Inflation, even if it takes a few years for the currency to begin circulating, or the death of the pound? Take your choice.

Stock Markets and Gold

Now for more news, your stock market investments may be worth under one-third of their value in 2000.  Gasp.  Yes, the gain of the last 20 years has been illusory.  For sure, some countries and some market sectors have done better than others, but for the USA main index, this is exactly what has happened.

(Chart: DJIA priced in ounces of gold)

Even if large corporations prosper, the US DJIA stock index and gold have a history of a near meeting when a financial crisis bottoms out. Currently, the DJIA is worth around 14 times the price of an ounce of gold. In 1932 and 1980, just over one ounce of gold bought the DJIA. Whether a large stock market crash achieves that, as was the case in 1932, or inflation pushing up the gold price, as was the case in 1980, it may be destined to happen again.

Currency Delivery in 2020

The whole Corona crisis has also shown how digital the world has become concerning money. The furlough scheme is a major example in itself. UK Businesses were expected to log their furlough claims using the internet. The IT infrastructure and software to support this was in place in record time – major IT projects can often take months or years to design, develop, thoroughly test, and release. It’s then an example of how the currency can now be distributed quickly to millions, through the central government, to businesses, then distributed electronically to customer accounts in banking computers. Not a single physical coin or note ever having existed.

Many other nations introduced a furlough scheme, but the USA did not. In this case, they mailed out Corona stimulus cheques of $1,200 to everyone. Lamenting, while doing so, that it was a shame that it was taking longer because they needed to get signatures on every cheque. Then, that it would have been so much easier had they had more direct banking details, such as a nominated bank account, to send the money out to the recipients electronically.

As to spending, well, more and more of it became electronic as internet shopping took off even further. Still, some preferred physical currency to a certain extent. However, one of the early casualties of Corona has been cash – the number of shops now insisting on electronic payments only and media stories saying that cash can help spread the disease is a clear signal that the system no longer wants people using old-fashioned coins and notes. Also, remember Gresham’s law about bad money forcing out good? There is probably a case that people are genuinely retaining more banknotes and coins at home, just if they are needed for some kind of emergency. However the Corona crisis goes, it doesn’t seem like good news for savers or freedom.

Furlough

The Corona / COVID-19 crisis has invented a whole new multitude of ways to distribute money to favoured interests and individuals. In addition to being unemployed, you can now get your full salary for doing nothing, while someone else you worked with has to continue to do their job, on the same salary, with all of the commitments their job requires. In the UK that has become known as ‘furlough’.  In many cases, it goes way beyond those in employment – the self-employed can also make claims to get their earnings covered. Staying at home, being paid full salary, having all the time in the world to do the house up, improve the garden, or even find another job to boost your earnings even more – a concept in the UK that has become affectionately known as “double-dipping.” It all sounds idyllic, doesn’t it, but there must be a catch, and, of course, there is.

If the various schemes introduced to pay employed people to do nothing sound like a major extension to the welfare system, then that’s probably because they are. Some people were bound to question the point in being productive, when for the same amount of money you could do nothing. Not everyone will feel that way, and some will be upset and stressed about the loss of work, but in terms of bending minds, taking power from people, and getting them used to rules, it is very reminiscent of the 1980s deindustrialisation of Northern England. A period when hopelessness and despair took over from community, self-sufficiency, and a strong work ethic. The schemes may also be the start of something that has been thrown around for several years now and never gained traction – Universal Basic Income. The concept of Universal Basic Income (UBI) is quite simple – every citizen is issued with a basic amount of government fiat currency per year, enough to live on. It never caught on because too many people could see through it – whatever the UBI level is, it would become the new zero, and self-sufficiency and freedom would surely be eroded. To say nothing of the existing gold base supporting more and more newly issued currency units every year.

Where the extra fiat currency has come from to fund all this, it is hard to see any real statistics on. We know that at some point, public borrowing must rise, and indeed, that is being presented through the news to make it palatable to the public, but increasing borrowing takes time. Wherever it came from, the consequence of these policies must be Inflation. Quite simply put, there must be a lot more currency units in circulation than there were a year ago, and even if the majority of those units are in bank accounts right now, doing nothing, at some point, they will begin to enter the market and circulate. At that point, prices must begin to rise. Whether this happens tomorrow or in a few years seems to be the only question.

ID2020

The Medical Care 2020 app is growing so big; it’s taking up all the resources on your smartphone. In the future, it may even store your COVID-19 test pass certificate, too, along with Microsoft’s proposed ID 2020 inoculation history – if there’s space. You may have to show them to be able to even travel, attend a football match or concert, should those things ever open up again.

https://inews.co.uk/sport/football/premier-league-coronavirus-test-health-passport-fans-prenetics-447547

Bluetooth

This innocuous little button that you may sometimes use to wirelessly broadcast music to a local device or your car has now taken on a new sinister aspect after the upgrade. Other smartphones in the vicinity, in the pockets of other users, now have apps harvesting your Device ID, the unique ID that can be used to track down your telephone, and ultimately, you. Did you consent to this? Some technology experts even claim that with Bluetooth turned off, your telephone is still detectable by  other smartphones.