The Most Valuable Real Estate in the World?

In the prior post I described how it is expected Singapore has an important role to play as a potential new Switzerland in the New Financial World Order. It makes sense, an important banking centre smack bang in the middle of the power struggle, an oasis of neutrality and peace amidst the turmoil around. When playing the geopolitics game, we don’t really want everything destroyed, do we? It’s also interesting to think that this new banking centre doesn’t need to be as physically big as Switzerland. Thanks to the internet, much of the back office work can be outsourced to other regions, along with the need for clandestine visits by shady characters needing to transfer money who can now just get it sent to an account anywhere in the world within the blink of an eye. Singapore must have a good internet infrastructure. For example, the number of visits to this website by “Huawei clouds, Singapore” have bumped up dramatically this past month.

Certainly, Singapore is already playing up to it’s future role as a global chessboard grand master, with comments like this by their president, expressing concern at the possibility of a military confrontation between China and USA. If such a confrontation occurs, expect the losing side to fight it with one hand tied behind their back, in the style of the latter days of Nazi Germany, where troop concentrations and movements were telegraphed to the Russians by an unknown spy high up within the Reichs Chancellery. Nothing can be left to chance in order to get the correct result, can it?

The real test for Singapore comes soon, when the World Economic Forum comes to town in August 17-20, 2021. I suppose then, we may expect some kind of relative tranquility next few months, before the next stages of the agenda are laid out and taken away in bite-sized chunks by each representative back to their respective countries to digest and implement. As interesting as it might be to be a fly on the wall, who with any compassion could bear to witness the spectacle of a bunch of sociopaths uncaringly carving up the world as if it was a birthday cake, dividing the planned spoils with no regard for the people and places whose lives might be destroyed by their actions?

As always, there are other threats to the global plans. Things can never be 100% certain and when you look closely at that map of Asia, especially the region where Singapore has such an important role, you see a threat.

That narrow Singapore strait where one-third of the world’s shipping must travel through right now to head West to India, the Middle East, Africa and Europe could be under threat from a future development. Yes, if only someone had the foresight to consider building a canal across the part of Thailand that goes south as a narrow peninsular to Malaysia and Singapore. Actually, they already did and what’s more, it’s a bit of contentious situation, as this story laying out the potential for conflict if China did fancy getting involved in such an undertaking implies. That Foreign Policy, a reknowned non-neutral news source comes out with a story like this to stir the embers should also really get you thinking.

It wouldn’t be the first time this area has been important militarily. In 1941, Japan amassed it’s taskforce on the Thai side of the border with Malaya, ready for invasion. The British General even asked London for permission to carry out a pre-emptive strike, knowing the issues they would face defensively, once the task force breached the border and began advancing south through Malaya. Someone in London said no. The rest, including the surrender of 100,000 allied troops in Singapore some weeks later, while the heavy artillery faced uselessly the other way out to the sea, is history.

Of course the on-ground realities are different to how a global map shows it. There are always people living there. People who might be fond of the lives they live and not really be keen on moving. Certainly the building of the Panama canal was no picnic – especially not for the people who died building it and the locals dispossessed by building of it. This area also happens to be quite a large tourist-earning centre for Thailand. If only there was a way to play the long game and encourage the locals to move on, so you could start buying up the land ready for this ambitous long-term project. Hell, engineer the right circumstances and you might even be able to buy the land up quite cheaply compared to it’s true value.

Which got me thinking of Christmas 2004…

There are also some other interesting videos out there showing how it looks now and the abandoned properties. However, the one that really caught my eye is a 1946 experiment to create a Tsunami using a nuclear bomb.

Certainly if that was possible in 1946, the question must be asked, what was possible by 2004? Some people are even asking similar questions about the Fukushima Nuclear reactor incident.

So, taking this into consideration, how’s the Thai tourist industry doing right now? After all, if it’s doing well, there’ll be few sellers, but if things are bad there might be a lot of forced sellers. COVID-19 wasn’t a good tourist season, was it? Well, as of May 2021, if you want to visit you’ll need to quarantine for 14 days, which I can’t imagine does anything to get tourism going again and some locals may well be temped to move or see their assets as liabilities…

The New World Financial Centre

The British Empire and Sir Stanford Raffles in particular were a very shrewd lot. They identified a seemingly irrelevant island with a population of about 150 people as a piece of prime real estate back in 1817. What’s happened since is well-known of course, as the city of Singapore has developed into a major international trade and financial hub, with all the wealth and status that goes alongside that.

This place had always been on my to do list, so when a work trip in 2018 presented me with the opportunity for a one day stopover, I took it with both hands. While I didn’t actually sit down for a Singapore Sling, I did take a wander around the Raffles hotel complex and see the art deco railway station, where bullet damage from the 1941 Japanese invasion was still visible in some of the outer walls, before it probably disappears as the city modernises even further and obliterates the British symbols. The railway itself has already been moved to the North of the island and the future of the station seemed uncertain then, but ghosts were visible everywhere, as I peered through the locked gate into the past, surrounded by modern skyscrapers. I also saw the 1920s post office building, now a hotel, the main square in front of the Town hall where hundreds of thousands were executed by the Japanese and one of the world’s most expensive pieces of undeveloped real estate, The Singapore Cricket Club. I can only wonder how much longer that last piece of Imperial history will last. The battle of Singapore itself in 1941 has always fascinated me. For obvious reasons, it does not feature large in British history when World War 2 is mentioned, but will probably forever be Britain’s biggest military defeat, with a loss of 100,000 military personnel into Japanese captivity and subsequent death, along with the loss of two Battleships – The Prince of Wales and The Repulse.

I’d love to revisit some day on less of an intense schedule, but I sense my days of travel are numbered and I’ve used most of those numbers up. No matter, at least I can say I saw some of the world before all prison doors were locked with a resounding thud.

At the time, I was not ignorant of the island’s position as a major trade route and centre of wealth. Goldmoney and Bullionvault have offered Singapore as a precious metals storage location for years. However, it’s only when you are actually there on the ground, staring up at the impressive skyscrapers that you really understand how the wealth and energy is migrating from the old world to the new.

It’s interesting how stories coincide once more and get you thinking on a particular route. A few weeks ago, I expressed the view that Bitcoin is a distraction, or a preparation for a release of a new monetary system to replace the Petrodollar that has existed since 1971, the year of my birth, the introduction of decimalisation to the UK, the closing of the Gold Convertibility window in the USA and the official founding of the World Economic Forum – more on the last one later. In my view, the coming of digital currencies is inevitable and they may not be nice, with features such as time limitation (spend it or lose it) and extra credits available only to those who follow the rules of society (get the jab or don’t eat meat?). However, for them to be truly accepted, they will need to engineer a collapse of the current system and when that system collapses, every monetary system change ever has had to promise some kind of gold backing to get the public onside.

Historically, the old world still rules the precious metals world, with familiar locations like New York, London and Switzerland being where most of that trade is transacted. As the old world declines further and the new world rises, an Asian powerhouse, one with independence, strong defences, good shipping links and a robust financial system to trade gold and silver is required. There’s no doubt on these metrics that Singapore ticks all the boxes.

What really triggered it was a story mentioning the huge new precious metals facilities being developed in Singapore. It’s not the first time media, including the BBC, have reported on this. Yes, it looks possible a new world currency backed by gold/silver is coming and it will all be stored in Singapore, perhaps with an offshoot for Europe in London. On this, Brexit suddenly makes more sense – a European nation outside EU control, a defendable island where the wealth can be stored as the mainland descends into destruction. The Corporation of London certainly has a pedigree line of survival and growth, regardless of the general situation in the country. You may laugh, but despite a recent short period of comparative peace, Europe has a long, long history of huge wars for resources and after a year of rewarding people for doing nothing, while the continent becomes ever-more dependent on a few producers to carry the mass on their shoulders cracks may appear and Atlas may yet shrug.

When you think about it, it’s interesting how Switzerland always managed to remain neutral during the many European wars of the last few centuries. It becomes clearer why when you are aware of the high levels of banking secrecy Switzerland has historically maintained regarding account holders and fund sources. Consider also how much plundered loot found its way to Switzerland during World War 2. Why, the World Economic Forum itself is even based in Switzerland and Klaus Schwab, it’s apparent founder, was born in Germany in 1938, just before World War 2 began. I’d be interested to learn more on his family history, and this article is something of a primer. Having conducted their meetings in Davos, Switzerland for the entire history of the organisation, they are now holding their first-ever meeting in Singapore in August, 2021.

On closer examination of the Asian map, Singapore is crucial to all trade heading from China, Japan and Korea etc to India then onwards to Europe. Ships can only sail through one narrow strait. The Evergreen in the Suez canal feels like the first visible supply disruption which will expose Europe to how reliant it has become on foreign imports of essentials. Perhaps when those containers do finally arrive, they will be loaded up with precious metals for the return trip as Europe is stripped bare?

Meanwhile, almost everyone in Europe wanders around like idiots, wearing masks and continuing to following “official advice”, not laws on all kinds of things that really are basic human rights, like seeing family and friends, or conducting mutally beneficial transactions with other human beings. Blithely unaware of the probable imminent end of their way of life. You know, that “way of life” that you have been told terrorists hated so much that it needed to be protected, yet was immediately signed away the moment you got told a new virus with a 99.6% survival rate hit?

What do I know really? If I was better at these things I wouldn’t be working in an office following the limitations of my school programming, but on the basis of these jigsaw pieces slotting together, perhaps we should be investing in Singapore. Especially banks if it is going to be the new Switzerland after the World Economic Forum meeting. Not to say there won’t be bumps along the way – one other thing about that map is the seeming inevitability of a conflict between the old world powers and the new. That same Asian map shows how China is totally hemmed in from the sea because the USA controls Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines. If China could punch through and take Taiwan or part of the Phillipines, they could control the Pacific. A war is brewing. I note, for example, that the UK recently sent their aircraft carrier to the China sea. A war in which Singapore will remain an agreed neutral by all parties, just like Switzerland did during the last century, but a war in which the destruction and rewards to the victors may well be huge and end up on this small island nation.

3 – and That’s The Magic Number

On the 3/3 a woman called Sarah, aged 33, was murdered by a man in London. A policeman, as it happens. I don’t claim the credit for spotting that one, but it does lead into some interesting coincidences, especially considering how the story has been used way beyond being a murder case that should be investigated with respect for everyone until…no, innocent until proven guilty and policing with logic instead of emotion seems to have gone by the wayside.

Amongst the media circus for everyone to invest their emotion in, there were even calls from some for a curfew for all men to be home by 18:00. That supposed believers in a free society think it’s okay that one incident like this should ride on the rights and livelihoods of 60 million-plus people is bizarre. However, it fits with the whole Corona regime that we are entering a Minority Report-style world where everyone is believed to be infected unless proven otherwise and now, everyone is believed to be guilty unless proven otherwise. Anyway, didn’t they miss the other big question it raises – who’s going to enforce this curfew if something so extreme was ever allowed to happen? The Police?

If there is anything to really be gained from this story, it’s surely that the police themselves cannot be trusted. I fear however, that even this will be used against humanity. All it needs is someone to say humans can’t be trusted to police each other…if only there was some way a computer, with it’s impeccable logic and lack of prejudice could do the job. Maybe a robocop or robodog? Let’s just forget for a moment that computer software is always programmed by humans, with huge margin for error. Robocop from the 1980s was rather prescient in seeing how it could go.

Meanwhile, journalism seems keen to focus on the alleged perpetrator still receiving his salary while suspended from his job. Even helpfully repeating across the globe how he will still receive his at least £33,000 salary. Here, here and here. What a bizarre figure to concentrate on. Unless…..dipping into the world of freemasonry, Google tells me there are 33,000 lodges worldwide, with 33,000 members in many lodges. Continuing the search theme, other newsworthy stories further feed the conspiratorial fires. It’s amazing how many COVID-19 injections seem to be delivered in batches of 33,000. Utah, for example, a home of alternative religion and mystic rites certainly seems keen on the magic number. Gibraltar just completed it’s injection programme too, although this media source doesn’t seem to be in on the numerical importance. Then we have the shooting in Georgia, also successfully being used to whip up racial and gender division where there previously was none, with this story helpfully telling us that the alleged perpetrator came from Woodstock, Cherokee county with a population of…33,000.

Why am I bringing all of this up, do you ask? Returning to the world of finance, let’s finish with the biggest 33,000 financial sign going. Amongst all these 3’s the world’s biggest stock market, the DOW Jones Industrial Average hit an all-time high last week. I don’t need to tell you what it was before you visit the link, do I? The Federal Reserve even helped out, the story tells us, with soothing words and promises of further stimuli to keep the party going, despite the reality of every economic indicator. I find myself wondering if words and actions may diverge soon. At least for a little while until other parts of the agenda are enacted.

I shall leave the final words to De La Soul, with their 90’s hit, although apparently that was a cover of Schoolhouse Rock / Bob Durrough in 1973. Meanwhile, we can all ponder what the 33,000 signifies to those in the know, along with asking the how and why of Wayne Couzens’ black left eye.

Tyrian Purple

At the very beginning of Gold, Silver and Freedom, there’s a whole chapter related to the similarities between now and the Roman Empire. No better example could exist than the presidential inauguration of 2021, Hail Caesar! As president Joseph Biden steps forth to receive his crown of thorns and lead the United States of America into a new era.

A closer look at the imperial crowning would’ve revealed greater symbology however. Looking behind the architecture of the doric columns we should be in no doubt who the real leader was at that inauguration. Hidden in plain sight, those in the know would have recognised the symbol instantly. Kamala Harris, decked out in Purple, the true colour of the ancient elite.

Therefore, we shouldn’t be surprised about what happens next. In fact, Biden himself has hinted at it several times. He’ll step down due to ill health, or worse and hand over to his deputy. Then, a woman so disliked that she could only get a few percent of Democratic party support in her own bid to become presidential candidate, will have the pathway to become president of the most militarily powerful nation in the world.

As a child, I collected stamps and the Victorian / Edwardian Britsh Empire ones were of special appeal. This was when I first encountered the colour Tyrian Purple, without even realising it’s ancient origins and symbolism. A cursory look online reveals the array of imperial stamps issued in that colour, signifying power to the subconcious of the imperial subjects, even if they don’t realise it as they write their letters. Well, why was the 2d Tyrian purple even priced in d, the lowest British currency denomination is pence? Again, denarius, the ancient silver coin of the Roman Empire. It’s all there when you look closely enough. I don’t claim to even scratch the surface of what else is hidden in plain sight.

To further prepare us for this, the BBC posted this story the other day, about how the royal dye has been discovered by Israeli archaeologists. Are you really telling me they had never, ever found a fragment before? A part of me even expects a follow-up story in a few months, where they find the royal dye is the exact same hue as that worn by Kamala herself during the inauguration. A further sign to those in the know who their new leader is, perhaps? Specualtion aside, the other interesting aspect of this story was how they never once referred to it by it’s true name. Tyrian Purple. Why?

I fear this new imperial reign will not end well. Not because I support any political party, but rather because I don’t and circumventing democracy itself is another theme explored in the chapter From Democracy to Corporatocracy. What could circumvent it more than sneaking in a candidate who would never have been voted in by the electorate? Worse, and once again we end with a question, the main one of all, why?

Atlas Shrugged

How a society can collapse and how the government responds when the most productive members cease to participate was covered in the novel ‘Atlas Shrugged’ by Ayn Rand. Like Marmite, this book is either loved or loathed by readers, but its view of a dystopian 1950s America in slow-motion decline is not too similar to now, in some ways.

I, Daniel Blake

The irony of the Priestley play “An Inspector Calls” and the judgemental way in which welfare is issued or not issued to the needy recipient should not be lost on modern Britain, as the government now acts as a much larger version of Mrs Birling. Deciding, almost arbitrarily with an iron fist, on whether someone gets help or not. Again, media commentary exists in the form of the 2016 Ken Loach film “I, Daniel Blake,” where someone who loses their work begins a downward life spiral, with his benefits gradually cut for failing to abide by Nanny’s rules. Even when those failures were for valid reasons. A cautionary tale for anyone thinking Nanny cares about them.

An Inspector Calls

After World War 2, it was no surprise the welfare state emerged and, with it, a whole load of new money distribution schemes. Setting the scene, there had just been a major war, and the people of the UK were weary. After all, what had they got out of it? There had to be something back in return for their sacrifices, didn’t there? That was what led to the ousting of Prime Minister Winston Churchill and the installation of a new Labour PM, Clement Atlee, in 1945.

“An Inspector Calls” is a 1945 play by J.B. Priestley, but based in Edwardian England, around 1910. There’s a poignant scene in which a poor commoner goes to the local poor council to ask for needed funds as she has lost her job and is pregnant. The unpleasant Mrs Birling, the wife of a well-to-do local industrialist, sits on the council and decides that this woman is undeserving of help, totally on her own personal whims. The woman dies later. Or does she? If you’ve not seen this play or film dramatisation, it is highly recommended. Priestley presented this scene to support the introduction of a more socialist regime in the UK.  Espousing free universal healthcare, regardless of circumstances.

Gold Reserves and Confiscation

Once governments got you used to the concept of using just one currency in your everyday transactions and got you used to the trust that they were looking after your gold – they began loaning it out and selling it off, often without your knowledge or consent.

(Chart: source: Wikipedia By Tsange – CC BY-SA 4.0)

Looking at the chart, it’s easy to see the UK gold reserves have declined massively, especially in the 1960s – leading to the famous ‘Pound in your Pocket’ speech by Prime Minister Harold Wilson in 1967, trying to assuage voters that their pound was still worth a pound, as the value plunged against other currencies. A pound of what, Harold? In 1999, the UK decided to sell off over half the nations’ remaining gold reserves, some 400 tonnes. At the time, gold was at the end of a major 20-year bear market, and the price was at an all-time low, a price last seen in the 1970s. The Bank of England, the custodian of the countries’ gold reserves, insists that it was never consulted in the decision, and some leaks, in fact, suggest that many of their staff vigorously opposed the move. They claim that Her Majesty’s Treasury and them alone made the decision. At the time, the Chancellor of the Exchequer was a Mr. Gordon “Golden” Brown, who subsequently became Prime Minister.

Even worse, the huge gold sales and auctions were publicly announced well in advance, thus giving gold dealers the chance to prepare for the glut of gold that was about to be released onto the market, and force the price down still further as a result. The normal strategy is to keep intended government gold sales quiet, then simply conduct the sales on the open market, obtaining the best prices possible, then announce the results afterward.

Why might a government decide to sell off one of the main assets of its people at the lowest price possible? There were rumours and accusations that the gold was sold to prevent top Hedge Funds who had got it wrong gambling on the price of gold from going bust and destroying the worldwide economy, among others.

Regardless of the truth of the rumours, 1999-2002 has subsequently been proved to have been exactly the right time to start buying gold, not selling it; in fact, the value of the gold sold by the UK has risen by over ten billion dollars since that time. This period in gold price history is now referred to as ‘The Brown Bottom.’

The Federal Reserve

As the current empire, the USA began 1900 with a strong, growing country, an economic powerhouse destined to lead the world, and best of all, their currency was all denominated in gold and silver.

The USA removed its link in gradual phases, but several major milestones stand out in history. The first of these was the creation of the Federal Reserve, in 1913, just before World War One, handing control of the US national currency to private banking interests. To emphasise the importance of this, remember Amschel Rothschild’s quote :-

“Give me control of a nation’s money, and I care not who makes the laws.”

― Amschel Rothschild

James Corbett’s superb “Century of Enslavement – History of the Federal Reserve” video and podcast documentary is highly recommended for the full history of how that happened.

Merv

There were many great rich cities along the Silk Road that are now just ruined, with little left of their tales of immense wealth. Merv in Iran, for example, had perhaps 500,000 people there at its peak, was a major centre of learning, and is now just a raised shell in a desert. The point is, people and wealth move, civilisation and empire grows, lives, and dies. It is never fixed, and it definitely never stays the same forever.