The Most Valuable Real Estate in the World?

In the prior post I described how it is expected Singapore has an important role to play as a potential new Switzerland in the New Financial World Order. It makes sense, an important banking centre smack bang in the middle of the power struggle, an oasis of neutrality and peace amidst the turmoil around. When playing the geopolitics game, we don’t really want everything destroyed, do we? It’s also interesting to think that this new banking centre doesn’t need to be as physically big as Switzerland. Thanks to the internet, much of the back office work can be outsourced to other regions, along with the need for clandestine visits by shady characters needing to transfer money who can now just get it sent to an account anywhere in the world within the blink of an eye. Singapore must have a good internet infrastructure. For example, the number of visits to this website by “Huawei clouds, Singapore” have bumped up dramatically this past month.

Certainly, Singapore is already playing up to it’s future role as a global chessboard grand master, with comments like this by their president, expressing concern at the possibility of a military confrontation between China and USA. If such a confrontation occurs, expect the losing side to fight it with one hand tied behind their back, in the style of the latter days of Nazi Germany, where troop concentrations and movements were telegraphed to the Russians by an unknown spy high up within the Reichs Chancellery. Nothing can be left to chance in order to get the correct result, can it?

The real test for Singapore comes soon, when the World Economic Forum comes to town in August 17-20, 2021. I suppose then, we may expect some kind of relative tranquility next few months, before the next stages of the agenda are laid out and taken away in bite-sized chunks by each representative back to their respective countries to digest and implement. As interesting as it might be to be a fly on the wall, who with any compassion could bear to witness the spectacle of a bunch of sociopaths uncaringly carving up the world as if it was a birthday cake, dividing the planned spoils with no regard for the people and places whose lives might be destroyed by their actions?

As always, there are other threats to the global plans. Things can never be 100% certain and when you look closely at that map of Asia, especially the region where Singapore has such an important role, you see a threat.

That narrow Singapore strait where one-third of the world’s shipping must travel through right now to head West to India, the Middle East, Africa and Europe could be under threat from a future development. Yes, if only someone had the foresight to consider building a canal across the part of Thailand that goes south as a narrow peninsular to Malaysia and Singapore. Actually, they already did and what’s more, it’s a bit of contentious situation, as this story laying out the potential for conflict if China did fancy getting involved in such an undertaking implies. That Foreign Policy, a reknowned non-neutral news source comes out with a story like this to stir the embers should also really get you thinking.

It wouldn’t be the first time this area has been important militarily. In 1941, Japan amassed it’s taskforce on the Thai side of the border with Malaya, ready for invasion. The British General even asked London for permission to carry out a pre-emptive strike, knowing the issues they would face defensively, once the task force breached the border and began advancing south through Malaya. Someone in London said no. The rest, including the surrender of 100,000 allied troops in Singapore some weeks later, while the heavy artillery faced uselessly the other way out to the sea, is history.

Of course the on-ground realities are different to how a global map shows it. There are always people living there. People who might be fond of the lives they live and not really be keen on moving. Certainly the building of the Panama canal was no picnic – especially not for the people who died building it and the locals dispossessed by building of it. This area also happens to be quite a large tourist-earning centre for Thailand. If only there was a way to play the long game and encourage the locals to move on, so you could start buying up the land ready for this ambitous long-term project. Hell, engineer the right circumstances and you might even be able to buy the land up quite cheaply compared to it’s true value.

Which got me thinking of Christmas 2004…

There are also some other interesting videos out there showing how it looks now and the abandoned properties. However, the one that really caught my eye is a 1946 experiment to create a Tsunami using a nuclear bomb.

Certainly if that was possible in 1946, the question must be asked, what was possible by 2004? Some people are even asking similar questions about the Fukushima Nuclear reactor incident.

So, taking this into consideration, how’s the Thai tourist industry doing right now? After all, if it’s doing well, there’ll be few sellers, but if things are bad there might be a lot of forced sellers. COVID-19 wasn’t a good tourist season, was it? Well, as of May 2021, if you want to visit you’ll need to quarantine for 14 days, which I can’t imagine does anything to get tourism going again and some locals may well be temped to move or see their assets as liabilities…

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